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Hapkido is an eclectic Korean martial art that employs hand and leg strikes at long distance and joint locks and throws at close range, emphasizing circular motion. Fighting advantage is gained by using footwork and body position to increase leverage, avoiding a direct confrontation of strength. Hapkido evolved from jujitsu techniques brought from Japan to Korea following WWII.

Street fighting is a colloquial term used to denote unsanctioned, usually illegal, hand-to-hand fighting in public places, between individuals or groups of people. User(s) Pandora

Muay Boran (lit. "Ancient boxing") is an umbrella term for the unarmed martial arts of Thailand prior to the introduction of modern equipment and rules in the 1930s. It is thus the direct ancestor of modern Muay Thai. User(s) Khlạ̀ng

Karate is a martial art developed in the Ryukyu Islands in what is now Okinawa, Japan. It was developed from indigenous fighting methods called Te (手, literally "hand"; Tii in Okinawan) and Chinese kenpō. Karate is a striking art using punching, kicking, knee and elbow strikes, and open-handed techniques such as knife-hands. Grappling, locks, restraints, throws, and vital point strikes are taught in some styles. A karate practitioner is called a karateka (空手家). User(s) Yamamoto Takeshi

Jujutsu (柔術 jūjutsu) (also known as Ju-Jitsu, Jiu-Jitsu, or Jujitsu), is a Japanese martial art and a method of close combat for defeating an armed and armored opponent in which one uses no weapon, or only a short weapon. User(s) Yamamoto Takeshi

Boxing, also called pugilism, is a combat sport in which two people fight each other using their fists for competition. Boxing is typically supervised by a referee engaged in during a series of one- to three-minute intervals called rounds, and boxers generally of similar weight. The birth hour of boxing as a sport may be its acceptance by the ancient Greeks as an Olympic game as early as 688 BC. Modern boxing evolved in Europe, particularly Great Britain. User(s) Nigel Faulkner

Piguaquan (Traditional Chinese: 劈掛拳, literally "chop-hanging fist"), also known as Piguazhang (劈掛掌, "chop-hanging palm") due to its emphasis on palm techniques, is often practiced along with Bājíquán (八極拳, literally "eight extremes fist") and is a style of wushu (Chinese martial arts) that features explosive, long-range power.

Bājíquán (traditional Chinese: 八極拳; pinyin: Bājíquán; Japanese: 八極拳, Hakkyokuken) is a Chinese martial art that features explosive, short-range power and is famous for its elbow strikes.

Zui Quan (Traditional and Simplified Chinese: 醉拳; pinyin: Zuì Quán) is literally Drunken Fist, also known as Drunken Boxing or Drunkard's Boxing) is a concept in traditional Chinese martial arts, as well as a classification of modern Wushu forms. Zui Quan is sometimes called Zuijiuquan (Chinese: 醉酒拳; pinyin: zhìjiǔquán, literally "Drunken Alcohol Fist"). User(s) Khlang.

Taekwondo (태권도; 跆拳道; Korean pronunciation: [tʰɛkwʌndo], founded by General Choi Hong Hi is a Korean martial art and the national sport of South Korea. In Korean, tae (태, 跆) means "to strike or break with foot"; kwon (권, 拳) means "to strike or break with fist"; and do (도, 道) means "way", "method", or "art". Thus, taekwondo may be loosely translated as "the art of the foot and fist" or "the art of kicking and punching." User(s) Nigel Faulkner.

Aikido (合気道 Aikidō) is a Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba as a synthesis of his martial studies, philosophy, and religious beliefs. Aikido is often translated as "the Way of unifying (with) life energy"[1] or as "the Way of harmonious spirit." Ueshiba's goal was to create an art that practitioners could use to defend themselves while also protecting their attacker from injury. User(s) are Katsumi.

Jeet Kune Do (also "Jeet Kun Do", "JKD," or "Jeet Kuen Do") is a hybrid martial arts system and life philosophy founded by martial artist Bruce Lee with direct, non classical and straightforward movements. Due to the way his style works they believe in minimal movement with maximum effect and extreme speed. User(s) are Fudo, Zhong, and Kage Ryu.

Kenjutsu (剣術 meaning "the method, or technique, of the sword”) This is opposed to kendo, which means the way of the sword. Kenjutsu is the umbrella term for all traditional (koryū) schools of Japanese swordsmanship, in particular those that predate the Meiji Restoration. It sometimes more generally describes any martial art that uses the Japanese sword, including the modern styles of Kendo and Iaido that emerged from the traditional schools in the late 19th century. User(s) Mishima Kenshin.

Kendo (剣道 kendō?), meaning "Way of The Sword", is a modern Japanese martial art of sword-fighting based on traditional samurai swordsmanship, or kenjutsu. Kendo is a physically and mentally challenging activity that combines strong martial arts values with sport-like physical elements. User(s) Yamamoto Takeshi.

Wing Chun (traditional Chinese: 詠春; pinyin: yǒng chūn; literally "spring chant"), also romanized as Ving Tsun or "Wing Tsun," (and sometimes substituted with the characters 永春 "eternal springtime"); (also known as Snake-Crane style); is a concept-based Chinese martial art and form of self-defense utilizing both striking and grappling while specializing in close-range combat.

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